Harry Clayton Quinn obituary photo
 
In Memory of

Harry Clayton Quinn

April 15, 1925 - March 26, 2015

Obituary


On March 26, 2015, Harry Clayton Quinn, Jr., age 89, went to be with the Lord. Visitation will be held Sunday afternoon March 29, 2015, 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Parkway Memorial Cemetery in Ridgeland, Mississippi. Additional visitation will be held on Monday morning 11:00 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. at the Chapel of First Baptist Church Jackson, Mississippi, with the funeral service following at 12 noon. Burial will follow at Parkway Memorial Cemetery in Ridgeland, Mississippi. Parkway Memorial Funeral Home in Ridgeland is handling the arrangements.



Mr. Quinn was born...

On March 26, 2015, Harry Clayton Quinn, Jr., age 89, went to be with the Lord. Visitation will be held Sunday afternoon March 29, 2015, 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Parkway Memorial Cemetery in Ridgeland, Mississippi. Additional visitation will be held on Monday morning 11:00 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. at the Chapel of First Baptist Church Jackson, Mississippi, with the funeral service following at 12 noon. Burial will follow at Parkway Memorial Cemetery in Ridgeland, Mississippi. Parkway Memorial Funeral Home in Ridgeland is handling the arrangements.



Mr. Quinn was born in Brookhaven, Mississippi, on April 15, 1925, to the late Clara Bell Rushing Quinn and Harry Clayton Quinn, Sr. Harry, the third-born of six sisters and one younger brother, was raised on the family farm in Lincoln County. When Harry was 13, his father died and Harry assumed the male leadership of his house and farm. He was always grateful for the assistance and guidance of their worker, Fred Butler, who helped the Quinn family maintain ownership of the farm during difficult times.



After finishing the 11th grade, Harry was enlisted in the United States Army and found himself on the battlefields of World War II with the 4th Infantry Division. On D-Day, he stormed Utah Beach during the Invasion of Normandy. Several weeks later, Harry was ultimately wounded by enemy shrapnel near Cherbourg, France. Skilled physicians saved his leg, but an administrative error saved his life. Though an officer had given the nurse a verbal order to discharge Harry back to the States, the nurse accidentally did not hear the order. His intended plane flying wounded soldiers back to the United States was shot down by V-2 rockets later that day. This event would prove a providential mistake that would influence countless lives and multiple generations to come. For his service, he was awarded the Purple Heart upon return to the United States and later the French Legion of Honor by the Consulate General of France.



After a 5 month hospitalization for his wounds, Harry returned home only to meet Emily Esteen Adams at an Arlington High School basketball game. The crafty Emily keenly used the soldier’s younger brother to encourage Harry to come sit next to her. The rest was history. Emily Adams married Harry Quinn on November 18, 1945. After taking a brief and adventurous honeymoon to McComb, Mississippi, the newlywed couple made Pascagoula, Mississippi, their home while Harry worked for Ingles Shipyard. The couple would later settle in Jackson, Mississippi. During the early years of marriage, Emily and Harry had two children: Beverly Kay Quinn and later, Harry Clayton “Clay” Quinn, III. Harry and Emily were blessed with 66 wonderful years of marriage until Emily’s death in 2012.



Upon moving to Jackson, Harry began working for Armstrong World Industries. He entered as a custodian sweeping the floors—working honestly, diligently, and ingeniously. Upon retirement after 42 years with the company, Harry had progressed from the young custodian to a Line Supervisor and Quality Control Manager. His early adoption of computer technology, implementation of the “Team Concept”, and changes to the manufacturing lines propelled the Jackson plant to an industry-wide leader during that period. He was later able to travel to Armstrong plants worldwide as a consultant. Harry’s keen, perfectionistic eye could also be seen in the way he tended his yard, including perfectly manicured grass rivaling golf courses, flowers blooming year-round, and multiple “Yard of the Month” achievements.



After retirement, ten of the best years of Harry’s and Emily’s lives were spent working in Yellowstone National Park. Harry was head of the lawn crew at Mammoth Hot Springs. Each summer he meticulously planted hundreds of petunias, only to have the native elk consume them. Harry would refer to his petunias as “elk salad.” He constantly was in the process of devising grand schemes to change their taste of his petunias. After Emily’s death, Harry moved to The Blake at the Township in Ridgeland, MS. It was here that he continued to pursue his love of nature and an active lifestyle. Any given day, he could be found catching bass in the lake, exercising by walking 3 miles around the lake, working on the indoor plants, or carefully pruning the roses that surround the property.



Despite the above accomplishments, nothing gave him more joy than to invest in the lives of others. Harry was ordained a deacon at age 23 and served actively at his church until he was 87. Harry taught 7th grade boys’ Sunday School from the age of 18 until the last few years of his life. He took friends and colleagues hunting and fishing. He coached youth basketball for many years. But most importantly, he invested in his children and grandchildren: rides in the Red Flyer wagon, life lessons taught in the woods, butterscotches and faith passed down the aisle at church, saying “I love you” at every single opportunity. He was a man who knew how to invest with generosity and love. Most importantly, he loved the Lord Jesus. It was this love that overflowed into the lives of countless friends and his beloved family.



Mr. Quinn is survived by his daughter Beverly Quinn Weeks and husband Steve Weeks of Ridgeland, MS. He is also survived by his son Clay Quinn of Raymond, MS. Mr. Quinn is also survived by his grandsons Dr. Stephen Weeks and his wife Michele Hampton Weeks, Dr. Christopher Weeks, and Dr. Andrew Weeks, all of Jackson, MS. He is also survived by sister Ernestine Quinn Brown of Brookhaven, MS; brother Earl Quinn of Laurel, MS; sister Betty Quinn Allred of Brookhaven, MS; and sister Dot Quinn Scadden of Garland, TX.



Mr. Quinn is preceded in death by his beloved wife Emily Esteen Quinn, parents Clara Bell and Harry Quinn, Sr., sisters Ruthie Quinn Huckaby, Eva Quinn Huckaby, Aline Quinn Lingle, granddaughter Tiffany Quinn, daughter-in-law Annette Quinn and a host of friends with whom he is now reacquainted.



Dr. Christopher Weeks, his grandson, will be officiating his funeral service. Graveside service will be held at Parkway Memorial Cemetery following the funeral service. Mr. Quinn will be honored by his country with a graveside military honor detail. Music at the funeral service will be presented by Eva Hart, pianist; Rich Price guitarist/vocalist; Dea Dean, vocalist; and Chris Adams, vocalist.



Pallbearers will be his three grandsons Stephen Weeks, Christopher Weeks, and Andrew Weeks. Also serving as pallbearers will be his son-in-law Steve Weeks, and dear friends Jack Riseden, Lifei Ji, and Victor Smith.



His family wishes to express endless gratitude to Cynthia Enochs, a member of the Quinn-Weeks family who gave selfless love, tending, caring, and befriending to Mr. Quinn over the past 3 years. Mr. Quinn would introduce Cynthia as his adopted daughter, for in his heart, she indeed was. The family also wishes to express profound gratitude to Essie Johnson for her gracious and loving care during times of medical need.



To close, Harry would want you to read the words said by D.L. Moody and know that they are true of him: “Someday you will read in the paper I am dead. Don’t you believe a word of it! At that moment I shall be more alive than I am now.”



Memorials may be made in the form of flowers for the funeral services or a gift to Jackson Preparatory School, 3100 Lakeland Drive, Jackson, MS 39232, www.jacksonprep.net.